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North Carolina
Aug 1st, 2009 by Tom

Wreck Summary

Type  Shipwrecks
Build  Steel
Location

 Moorehead City, North Carolina, USA

Depth  60-120 feet
Length  Various
Built  Various
Sank  Various
Access  Boat
Experience Level  Beginner to Advance
Orientation

 Various

To say that diving in North Carolina offers a unique experience is an understatement akin to saying the Grand Canyon is larger than a bread box. In a relatively limited area it has some of the best of what diving is all about.

Most of the wrecks date from World War II, sunk in numerous ways, mostly from German U-boats (submarines). In one of those ironic twists where the hunter becomes the hunted, a U-boat is one of the most popular wrecks that brings divers from around the world. To be honest, the idea of diving a sub, at least in this instance, is better than actually diving it. From what I have seen, many people who dive it leave somewhat disappointed, myself included. The reasons for that are simple: the exterior of a sub is minimalist by design, everything is on the inside, and this wreck does not readily invite penetration since it is tight and silty (bad combination) with numerous entanglement hazards. Much of the outer hull has rusted away and it does not much resemble a submarine anymore.

Having said that, the sub was the ONLY disappointment about all of North Carolina diving, everything else exceeded expectations by an order of magnitude. Due to its location the gulf stream flows just off shore, meaning although dives are done miles out into the ocean, water temperatures are in the 70 degree area for most of the summer. Ditch the drysuit and get out the 3mm wetsuit - you can be forgiven for thinking you’re in the Bahamas, it’s that warm. That warm water makes for easy diving and prolific marine life. I was not prepared for the colorful critters and the absolute abundance of life. When our captain briefed us in a truly enjoyable southern drawl saying, "When you get down you may not be able to see the wreck, it’s usually covered in fish but you can drop just below them and you’ll see the wreck just fine," I was entirely certain he was kidding. He wasn’t.

As if wrecks of every shape and size, along with myriad fish species were not enough there is another major item which draws divers to this spectacular region: sand tiger sharks. The Australian name for this species seems much more appropriate - ragged tooth shark, because they have more teeth than can fit in their mouths, making them look entirely sinister and dangerous. It was difficult to tell how many sharks were on the few wrecks they elect to congregate around due to the way they swim in and out of your range of visibility, but a conservative estimate would say 30-50 on a wreck like the Schurz, ensuring you’re not about to fall asleep on that dive. Check out http://www.nc-wreckdiving.com/shipwrecks.html for a list of North Carolina wrecks.
 

 

Florida Wrecks
Aug 1st, 2009 by Tom

Wreck Summary

Type  Wrecks, reefs, caves, you name it
Build  Mostly by union members
Location

 Florida, USA

Depth  20 to a lot of feet
Length  Variable
Built  Variable
Sank  Variable
Access  Boat, Shore and Parachute
Experience Level  Guppy to Dive Guru
Orientation

 Every which way you can imagine

Here is a list of all the things Florida has to offer. No wait, that would take too long. It might take vastly less space to mention what Florida doesn’t have: volcanoes, mountains, and senior citizens that can drive well. That’s about it. Particularly for divers, Florida seems to have just about everything: caves, wrecks, reefs, and all in abundance.

Even if you’ve never cave dived, and aren’t cave certified, you can still get into a "cave" in Ginnie Springs which is one of the most famous cave diving locations in the world. If you do happen to be cave trained then you likely already know all about northern Florida, no matter where on the globe you call home.

Off the coast there are plenty of wrecks to dive, and more by the day. An active artificial reef program seems to drop a wreck frequently, giving divers more places to play and fish more places to call home, which attracts even more divers. Having had only a precious few days to dive the area I’ve only seen three wrecks (Duane, Bibb and Eagle) but by the accounts of those who have done vastly more diving there than I ever will, they are among the best the state has to offer.
 

 

Bay Islands (Roatan, Utila, Guanaha, in Honduras)
Aug 1st, 2009 by Tom

Tropical Reef Summary

Type  Tropical Reef /w a Few Shipwrecks
Build  Mother Nature
Location

 Bay Islands, Honduras, Caribbean Sea

Depth   feet
Difficukty  
Formations  
Marine Life
 
Current  
Access  Boat witj some Shore Diving
Experience Level  Guppy to Advanced

What do you get when you take a working boat from the Great Lakes, refit it, and turn it into a liveaboard vessel in the tropics? You get the cheapest date in the Aggressor fleet.

Roatan, the area where most of the diving was done, is touted as the "macro capital of the world". Not sure who started calling it that, but they likely weren’t too far off. Colourful little critters are plentiful so photographers and eagle-eyed fish lovers rave about the place. Aside from the fish there are two shipwrecks which were intentionally sunk not long ago, so they don’t have much life on them, yet.

Perhaps the highlight of the trip were the dives spent in a cavern that had shafts of light pouring in from holes in the "ceiling".

The boat itself was more than large enough (120′ long with 10 passenger cabins), quite spacious overall, had good food and plenty of room in the dive areas which helped make things very comfortable and easy to like.
 

 

Turks and Caicos
Aug 1st, 2009 by Tom

Tropical Reef Summary

Type  Tropical Reef /w One Wreck
Build  Mother Nature
Location

 Turks and Caicos

Depth  20 to 100 feet
Difficukty  Variable
Formations  
Marine Life
 
Current  
Access  Shore and Boat
Experience Level  Beginner to Advanced

Ever look back at old family albums and laugh your posterior off at how bad the shots were, how old the hairstyles look, and utter repeatedly "What the hell was I thinkin?" Welcome to mine. These shots date back to 1998; my first underwater camera, my first trip to "the tropics", and my first escape from a rather brutal Canadian winter.

The resort was called South Caicos Ocean Haven, a decidedly small resort that likely wasn’t any bigger when it went by the name Club Caribe: 22 rooms, nearly as many air conditioners, no TV’s and no phones. Favourable adjectives that come to mind are: basic, rustic, simple, tasteful, off-the-beaten-path, diver-centric, unencumbered, comfortable, clean, and… did I mention basic? The less flattering ones would be: spartan,  lacking, undeveloped, and provisionless (if that’s a word). When I was there the new owner had taken over the place less than a year before and was still in the rebuilding phase - I’m sure it’s better now, if it’s still in business (it appears their website is no longer functioning).

The selection of dive sites available at the time was somewhat limited since they had not yet fully explored the area’s potential, but the sites we visited were excellent. Fish are plentiful since it is in a national park area which prohibits commercial fishing. Sharks, eagle rays, stingrays, crabs, trumpet fish, barracuda and  eels were common sightings at each of the sites which were a maximum of 15 minutes from the resort.

As a wreck aficionado the highlight was likely the plane, reportedly a DC-10 but seeming much smaller than that, complete with requisite swash buckling tale of it being a drug runner. The Arches was another favourite - a small coral arch that seemed to attract a rather abundant amount of marine life. Due to the out-of-the-way nature of the locale, it being the only resort on the island, and diving being just about the only thing to do on South Caicos, this is a destination clearly intended for divers only. The island is small, the population is small, the number of divers it sees is small, and the number of activities is small, but that all adds up to one valuable asset: the place has not been "dived out". The diver impact I could see was nil, the fish weren’t harassed regularly so weren’t as afraid of you as is common at more frequented destination, and having such short boat rides (particularly given the way flat hulled little Carolina skiffs like these abhor waves of ANY size) is a true blessing.
 

 

Truk Lagoon - Page V
Jul 30th, 2009 by Tom

Wreck Summary

Type  Shipwreck City Baby
Build  Steel
Location

 Micronesia

Depth  40-210 feet
Length  stinkin huge
Built  Vintage World War II
Sank  1944
Access  Boat
Experience Level  Beginner to Technical
Orientation

 Every which way you can imagine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Truk Lagoon - Page IV
Jul 30th, 2009 by Tom

Wreck Summary

Type  Shipwreck City Baby
Build  Steel
Location

 Micronesia

Depth  40-210 feet
Length  stinkin huge
Built  Vintage World War II
Sank  1944
Access  Boat
Experience Level  Beginner to Technical
Orientation

 Every which way you can imagine

I hear you asking, "So what is it like to dive in Truk Lagoon?" Good question, I’m glad you asked. It’s easy. Most people see the area on either of the two liveaboards, Truk Odyssey or Truk Aggressor. These fairly luxurious ships ferry you all over the lagoon, hitting the best spots and staying on the premiere wrecks for multiple dives so you can explore them properly. The Aggressor, being part of a chain, is better known but without hesitation I’d choose the Odyssey again in a heartbeat: it’s longer, has larger rooms, and carries less passengers (I’ve never been on the Aggressor but the owner of the Odyssey is a former captain of the Aggressor and I’m guessing knows the ship rather well). I’m not sure I could say enough good things about the Odyssey, so I won’t even try. Suffice it to say Odyssey is one of the few liveaboards in the world of that class where the owners are the captain and first mate (along with husband and wife) - they have a vested interest in making sure the customers are happy and have won BEST LIVEABOARD IN THE WORLD honours several times which demonstrates how well they’re doing.

Other options include the Thorfin (a ship which doesn’t move much), and some shore-based dive operations, which use small boats to get people out to the wrecks.

The water is warm, 82ish degrees year round, so most dive in 3mm wetsuit. Four or five dives a day is quite common, with the night dive always taking place on the same wreck as the afternoon dives so you’ll know your way around better. There is plenty of wreck penetration potential (for those properly trained) and you can get deep inside many of the wrecks, but most divers during our two weeks there didn’t venture inside and still raved about the trip. Wrecks ranged from 60′ to 200′ deep, with the vast majority of diving done at 100′ or less, so there was something for all comfort levels. Throw in a well orchestrated shark feeding dive and it is a hard trip to beat. On the non-diving days you can go on tours of the islands and see the remnants of the Japanese fortifications (pill boxes, canons, underground shelters, a sea plane base and more) which really bring history to life.

 

 

Truk Lagoon - Page III
Jul 30th, 2009 by Tom

Wreck Summary

Type  Shipwreck City Baby
Build  Steel
Location

 Micronesia

Depth  40-210 feet
Length  stinkin huge
Built  Vintage World War II
Sank  1944
Access  Boat
Experience Level  Beginner to Technical
Orientation

 Every which way you can imagine

That Truk had great wrecks was not a surprise, they’re everywhere, it’s what the place is known for. The shocking part was the small stuff, the critters of every shape, size and colour. Pipefish, clownfish, lionfish, crabs, nudibranchs, blennies and gobies abound. If small stuff isn’t to your liking they also have the usual large stuff like sharks, napoleon wrasse, and even the odd manta.
 

 

Truk Lagoon - Page II
Jul 30th, 2009 by Tom

Wreck Summary

Type  Shipwreck City Baby
Build  Steel
Location

 Micronesia

Depth  40-210 feet
Length  stinkin huge
Built  Vintage World War II
Sank  1944
Access  Boat
Experience Level  Beginner to Technical
Orientation

 Every which way you can imagine

It is disappointing at first to discover Truk Lagoon is mostly full of merchant vessels and not warships, but it has to be remembered they were carrying the implements of war. Most ships were retrofitted with sizeable gun for self defense, some carried tanks, trucks, artillery, landmines, ammunition, torpedoes, fighter planes, and more. And they’re not ALL merchant ships. There’s a destroyer, submarine and Betty bomber which sound like they should be highlights of the trip but aren’t. In comparison to the other wrecks these military vessels are smaller with vastly less penetration potential and character. It’s believed the sub was not hit during the attacks but tried to escape by submerging but in their haste not all hatches were closed in time and it went down with all hands. It was later depth charged so it could not fall into enemy hands.

 

Truk Lagoon - Page I
Jul 30th, 2009 by Tom

Wreck Summary

Type  Shipwreck City Baby
Build  Steel
Location

 Micronesia

Depth  40-210 feet
Length  stinkin huge
Built  Vintage World War II
Sank  1944
Access  Boat
Experience Level  Beginner to Technical
Orientation

 Every which way you can imagine

Technically the place is called "Chuuk", the name it used to have before it was occupied by hostile forces that couldn’t pronounce it right and changed it to "Truk", but divers still generally call it Truk Lagoon, or just "one of the best places to wreck dive in the world".

Courtesy of World War II this was the site of one of the pivotal naval battles of the entire war. Truk was one of the most prized locations in the world’s oceans: almost halfway between Japan and Australia, pretty close to the middle of nowhere. This is where Japanese warships and supply ships would meet to refuel, reload, and repair. The land based fortifications were considerable - if the allied forces had tried to take the islands by landing on them there’s a good chance they’d have gotten slaughtered because the Japanese had been building and digging in for years.

American forces had no plans to wage the battle on land - this was an air to sea battle of the highest order. An early American scout plane was spotted by the Japanese forces who raised the alarm and hurried many of the vessels out of the lagoon before the battle even started, but the ones left behind, mostly merchant ships, were sitting ducks.
 

 

Picton “Old”
Jul 24th, 2009 by Tom

Wreck Summary

Type  Shipwreck
Build  Wooden
Location

 Kingston, Lake Ontario

Depth  170 feet
Length  110 to 120 feet
Built  ???
Sank  ???
Access  Boat
Experience Level  Technical
Orientation

 Upright

What’s 120 feet long and sinks? Considering the site you’re reading this on, you can likely guess the answer to that. In this case it is a “new” and as of yet unidentified wreck near Picton, Ontario. Because it has not been dived for long, and was "discovered" around the same time as a wreck only a mile away that looks to be of a newer design, this one has been nicknamed the "old" one (at least for the time being). There are two groups with an archeological license to study this site so hopefully it won’t be nameless for long.

With a bluff bow, two cat’ed anchors, windlass, anchor chains, complete railing all the way around the ship, davits for a yawl boat over the transom, numerous deadeyes, masts fallen but nearby, this is one awfully nice wreck. There are also the precariously eroded remains of a wheel which looks about as fragile as a wheel can get.

A keen-eyed observer will also notice there is an odd structure on the bow, just below where the bowsprit would be. It looks like the kind of assembly that would be found underneath an ornate figurehead, which could very well have fit into the notch at the end.

 

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