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Northwind
Jul 22nd, 2009 by Tom

Wreck Summary

Type  Shipwreck
Build  Steel
Location

 North channel, Lake Huron

Depth  120 feet
Length  299 feet
Built  1888
Sank  1926
Access  Boat
Experience Level  Advanced to Technical
Orientation

 Upright

Some divers go a lifetime without ever getting to experience a wreck of the caliber of the Northwind.  At six inches shy of 300′ long it takes awhile to get to see. And considering it’s depth of up to 120′, bottom time can be limited which makes it mandatory to do more than one dive here (you won’t wanna leave anyway).

What makes this such a great wreck? I hear you ask… well, I’ll tell ya. Think of all the things that COULD make it a great wreck, and they’re probably here. If it was shallow it would be in pieces by now, so depth is an asset. It’s hull should be entirely in tact. It’s anchors should be in place, along with deck machinery, and have artifacts like pots and cooking utensils. It should have a prop, portholes with glass, bow in pristine condition, anchor chains, and a variety of penetration potential. The Northwind has it all. For good measure it also has a wooden life buoy, smokestack you can swim through, ladders, doors, a red sign on the mast with ship details, and other stuff just as neat as they are weird.

Although this wreck lacks a ship’s wheel it has one of the rarest artifacts in all of the Great Lakes: a bathtub. Bathing in it is not recommended.

 

Emma Thompson
Jul 22nd, 2009 by Tom

Wreck Summary

Type  Shipwreck
Build  Wooden steam barge
Location

 North channel, Lake Huron

Depth  28 feet
Length  125 feet
Built  
Sank  1914
Access  Boat
Experience Level  Beginner
Orientation

 Upright

Despite having been on the bottom of Lake Huron since 1914 the wreck of the Emma Thompson was only located in 1992. Since that time it has seen relatively few divers compared to just about any other shallow water wreck (like those in Tobermory) and it shows.

This wreck burned and sank rapidly but it is still in rather good shape considering its age and lack of (protective) depth. The few divers who have been here have been kind enough to collect many of the smaller, more portable items and place them on a raised rail that seems to run along what I’m guessing is the center of the ship. Tongs, tools, pulleys, and items beyond the limits of my imagination can be found here.

The sizeable boiler is still remarkably in tact, as is the prominent bow with three anchor chains, one of which runs to a metal stocked anchor which is half buried in the soft clay. A small sign located on the inside of the starboard wall gives details about the ship.

This wreck is not the biggest, or the best, but it is certainly the most interesting wreck I’ve seen yet that lies in less than 30′ of water.

 

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